In Analytics, Visualization

air-traffic-control

Why do we need situational intelligence?

When we lack information, or information is not easily consumed or comprehended, then our decisions are compromised. We don’t have the right information, at the right time, or in the right form to lead to the best possible outcome.

At its core, situational intelligence handles all of the relevant data needed to derive insights that will guide your decisions. Today’s environment typically means large volumes of disparate data, pouring too quickly into over-burdened systems, leaving executives and analysts alike wondering if they can believe the data they see.  Some insights can be derived only by sifting through this ever-growing mountain of data looking for hidden correlations. Correctly correlating and analyzing all of necessary the data and correctly presenting results, recommendations and predictions is the biggest differentiator of situational intelligence over traditional analytics.

Unlike typical business intelligence or stand-alone analytics solutions, with situational intelligence we receive valuable details, recommendations and predictions that typically result in enhanced competitive advantage through:

  • Cost savings
  • Increased efficiencies, productivity and performance
  • Increased revenues
  • Improved client engagement that raises satisfaction
  • Better understanding of exposure that facilitates better management of risk

To put this into a concrete example, consider why airports need flight and ground traffic control systems. There is the obvious answer – to know where airplanes vehicles and people are both in the air and on the ground, to safely and efficiently stage their movement. Managing traffic at an airport requires context, such as the current and forecasted weather, to achieve the best possible safety and efficiency. Even a seemingly simple matter such as a broken jetway has many consequences that affect the context of ground control, fueling, cabin cleaning, luggage, passenger relocation, food service, etc. Now, imagine the complexity of handling a crisis situation such as an airplane needing to make an unplanned emergency landing.

Managing an operation with as much complexity, interdependencies and consequences as an airport requires the staff in the operations control center to have a live, real-time, big-picture view of everything that is happening and, ideally, also what is most likely to happen. As you surely recognize, keeping track of so much fast-changing information in a person’s head alone is impossible and prone to errors and omissions.

Clearly having as much relevant and easily comprehensible information as possible provides the context that we naturally seek to guide our decisions and actions. In a follow-on blog I will explain why and how various technologies such as flexible data access, analytics, machine learning, artificial intelligence and visualization should be seamlessly integrated to create and deliver situational intelligence that is truly actionable.

 

(Image courtesy of Flikr)

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