In Internet of Things, Visualization

The Internet of Things in many ways is a catchall phrase that is used to describe everything from types of devices, to communications gateways, to new service-oriented business models. IoT devices generally are capable of sensing and communicating. IoT devices in the consumer sector include thermostats, door locks, garage door openers, etc. In the industrial sector there are many sensors used in manufacturing processes, vehicles, heavy equipment, and so on. Sensing and communicating data has traditionally been referred to as data acquisitions – a common IoT use case. What is often overlooked is the use of smartphones and tablets for data acquisition. These devices include several sensors such as for audio, video and motion.

The following story highlights how the mobile devices that we use every day are becoming integral to the IoT ecosystem.

Recently I was at a cafe with a friend. A former coworker of my friend whose name is Craig walked in, so my friend invited him to join us. My friend asked Craig “where you currently working?” Craig answered “I am working as an independent contractor developing a unique mobile app.”

With the Apple and Google app stores full of apps, and in many cases offering multiple apps that essentially do the same thing, I wondered what app could be new and unique. I quickly found out as Craig described how the app would help mining companies improve how they determine where mineral deposits most likely exist. Easier identification of mineral deposits will accelerate, optimize and lower the cost of mining – a definite game changer.

pick-shovelDetermining places to explore and excavate is a combination of manual labor and trial and error. Miners typically pick and scrape away at surfaces in a mine to collect sample material to be examined to determine if the sample contains mineral deposits. If mineral deposits are detected then further exploration at that area would be initiated.

Craig then explained how the app works. Each mineral has a unique signature that can be identified by a spectrometer (from how the mineral reflects light). Photos and videos taken with smartphones and tablets use compression so the signature cannot be detected using standard photo and video apps. The app he developed interfaces directly to the video sensor so it can analyze the reflected light with the needed fidelity to recognize spectral signatures that identify specific areas where desired mineral deposits can likely be found. The locations identified are marked and uploaded to an operations center for further review and for planning.

Learning about this app shows how ingenuity and software running on commercial off-the-shelf smartphones and tablets makes them applicable for data acquisition use cases. More use cases that integrate people and mobile apps into IoT use cases will surely ensue.

So the next time you pick up a smartphone or tablet think of the myriad of uses it can be programmed to perform, especially when connected to other devices, systems and people. If you know of clever uses of mobile apps for IoT use cases, please comment.

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