In Use Cases, Visualization

The world is going crazy for Pokémon Go. Nintendo’s stock value is making huge gains while masses of people are out hunting little ‘holographic’ critters. The technology isn’t new. Yelp has had a similar functionality out for 4 years called monocle. Yet this ‘Pokemon Go’ has made a ginormous splash. How? They used a technology to solve a pain point which is evidenced by their profitability so I don’t want validate that product vision here. Instead I’d like to answer another question which is “How can Augmented Reality help Enterprise on the same scale as the B2C market?”

The first part of the answer is that the motive to introduce AR to enterprise should not be about making a lot of money but rather helping a lot of brilliant people attain more.  Guy Kawasaki says, “The genesis of great companies is answering simple questions that change the world, not the desire to become rich.” The same applies within an organization eyeing new product offerings.

The second part of the answer is more involved so first I’ll discuss proof that Augmented Reality indeed helps brilliant people dive into a use case and then highlight some good User Experience design principles stemming from neuroscience that will make the use case come to life.

Augmented Reality (AR) is a technology that registers digital aspects onto the physical world around us. A stop light could be considered primitive Augmented Reality (AR). AR on Mobile Devices isn’t new but neither was the tablet before Apple made mountains of cash by designing it the right way. After Google Glass, there was a healthy dose of skepticism that everyday people would enjoy using Augmented Reality. Many would assume that if people don’t want it on their glasses with their hands free then why would they want to use a hand to hold the same information that they didn’t find useful?

Even as AR is in its technological infancy, Market guru Greg Babb explains how Augmented Reality reduced errors and time to complete task for wing assembly study presented by Paul Davies in conjunction with Iowa State and Boeing.

The chart above shows that wing assembly took significantly less time than traditional methods of assembly. There tends to be a major drive in Enterprise AR use cases to build applications for field crews and those assembling things. Meta CEO Meron Gribetz is on the record of saying he expects to throw away all the monitors in his office by next year and just work with AR headsets. This is compelling because Meta consists of developers, designers and scientists. That means knowledge workers would be using AR at their desk. This is either crazy or prophetic.

So what would an enterprise application look like? Well lets look at it through the lens of situational intelligence. Let’s consider the following use case:

Wind Turbine Use Case

A scientist at an energy company needs to run some prescriptive analytics for wind turbines. Government compliance and regulations have just been reformed and costly repairs and updates to the machinery has to be implemented on an accelerated pace. Heavy fines will be instituted for safety violations. Our scientist wants to use Matlab to run simulations on existing wind turbines to predict which turbines have a greater risk of breaking down, overheating or malfunctioning. He is think she can get more longevity out of gearboxes for yearly use within certain confidence levels.

  • He first speaks out loud saying,”Show me wind farms in central California.”
  • He sees a 3D map of several wind farms that he spins with his hands
  • The length of time he gazes at a certain region makes it slowly expand
  • He sees temperature on 4 wind farms with a high failure prediction
  • He increases severity of wind velocity changes in his data set and sees gearbox 4 fail
  • His gaze on the fourth gearbox chart line causes a line to appear animating towards the holographic turbine
  • He picks up the turbine, swipes the outer shell away and sees the motor spinning
  • He dictates notes about the turbine and recommends replacing the gearbox sooner than others

Outcome

Our scientist is able to work faster in a more implicit manner without opening various files and programs with a mouse. He has more visual real estate and can now work with depth rather than just up and down dimensions. He is more productive, which makes his company more money.

Neural Interface Design

Pictorial Cues are an important aspect of good user experience that make a scene more realistic in AR. Some of these can be:

  • Occlusion – One object blocking part of another
  • Relative Size – Equal sized objects taking less area within our field of vision when their distances from us vary
  • Shadows – Objects that casts shadows seem more real
  • Accretion – Aspects of an object appear as a user moves in the physical world

Another aspect to design for in AR is binocular disparity as it assists with depth perception. Studies show that the neurons in our visual cortex fire optimally when there is a amount of specific disparity with a stimulus. So that is why you see one wind turbine moved to the right of another in the wireframe.

So maybe you won’t get to go hunting Pokémon at work if your company is smart enough to outfit you with one but you will definitely feel like a Jedi when manipulating the world around you with your senses. You will love sharing this world with your co-workers. Augmented Reality unleashes you imagination. The next couple years show some exciting times ahead for Reality Computing!

Special thanks to JulianHzg for making a great Wind Turbine in Blender that I recolored and used in my wireframe.

 

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

iiot-visual-analytics-map