In Use Cases

Watering sidewalks wastes water.While human populations shift, migrate and grow, the amount of fresh water remains constant. (The only way to make large quantities of fresh water is desalination, which is energy-intensive and practical only near the ocean.) To serve more people from the same supply of water, communities increasingly are turning to conservation measures.

In times of drought, communities employ water usage restrictions such as banning car washing and limiting lawn watering to certain days of the week or month. These rules rely on observable behaviors that aren’t easily enforced unless the utility employs smart meters or water cops—or both.

Analytics provide water utilities with unique ways to encourage participation in conservation without smart meters and water cops. Here are a couple of examples.

Pinpoint water conservation opportunities

Some utilities offer financial incentives such as loans or rebates for people willing to take the conservation steps of removing their lawn. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency,  landscape irrigation nationwide accounts for nearly one-third of all residential water use, totaling nearly 9 billion gallons per day.  Which customers are likely to participate?

A first step for utilities is identifying the areas where such a lawn removal program can be successful. Geo-spatial analytics identify portions of the utility service territory where home footprint is small relative to lot size, which shows customers with a potentially high percentage of irrigable land. Locating such lots in areas with less tree cover shows yards that may require more watering in hot months. Sorting a list of these houses by the size of their seasonally-adjusted water bill shows you customers who might be motivated to lower their water bills by replacing some grass with hardy, native perennial shrubs and ground covers.

You might want to filter out houses with pools and hot tubs, to prevent those large water uses from skewing your results. Also, you could focus on households without children living at home. These households might lack built-in labor for mowing and be paying a lawn care company as well as high water bills.

Make conservation a game

Gamification applies concepts such as skills, challenges, points and rankings to non-game contexts such as conservation. Gamification brings out the competitor in us and can make conservation if not fun, then at least a little more rewarding and less boring.

One simple conservation game simply shows you how your water use compares with houses geographically close to you and with households that resemble yours in terms of lot size, people in household, and number of bathrooms. Improving your standing relative to those like you earns you points and entitles you to prizes.

Another, more active game may be to progress through levels of conservation skill, knowledge and savings by accepting certain challenges. Challenges could include doing a home water audit using the utility’s online tools, installing free low-flow showerheads from the utility, or cashing in rebates on low-flow toilets. You receive points as you complete challenges and lower your consumption. Analytics show you how you compare with your neighbors who are and aren’t playing the game. Achieving certain levels in the game might entitle you to prizes such as gift cards or bill rebates.

Fairly simple analytics run behind the scenes in these games to award points and keep score. More sophisticated analytics might be used to recruit players for the game and to target the challenges and rewards to more closely match the water saving needs and opportunities of their neighborhood and household type.

(Image courtesy of ewapee / 123RF Stock Photo)

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