In Analytics

Electric utilities, cable operators, pipeline companies, railroad, municipalities—all will tell you that it’s a jungle out there. Vegetation has a way of interacting with and interrupting the operations of technologically sophisticated and complicated networks. Even your wireless communication networks are not immune to the impacts of vegetation.

Vegetation causes trouble in several ways:

  • Falling onto assets, such as trees falling across roads, damaging them or rendering them unusable
  • Growing into assets, such as roots growing into sewer lines, lowering their performance or making them fail
  • Making contact with assets and causing malfunctions, such as tree limbs touching power lines and causing power outages or sparking fires
  • Allowing wildlife to contact assets and cause equipment failure, such as bushes helping squirrels enter substations and disrupt power operations
  • Obstructing rights of way such as roads, bridges, tunnels and waterways, for example reeds and seaweed clogging ship channels

Similarly, the lack of vegetation can also be a problem. Slopes that have lost their vegetation due to wildfires during times of drought become prone to erosion and landslides when rains finally return. If these areas are adjacent to roads, waterways, power lines, pipelines or other assets that you own or operate, sudden ground movement from erosion or landslide could damage your equipment or block access.

An asset-intensive organization can spend millions of dollar per year on spraying, trimming, pruning, removing and replanting vegetation. Its labor intensive work with costs that add up quickly. When you experience an unplanned event related to vegetation—tree fall, land slide, brush fire—your emergency costs pile up while services are interrupted.

There are vegetation management systems available to organizations today. Maybe you use one. These mainly target the management of scheduled activities, routes and workers. They are useful, and can be augmented to be more valuable by integrating intelligence about actual and potential problems into the scheduling of trim activity. Advanced analytics will identify the areas most in need for trimming or other management and also optimize overall crew schedules so that your vegetation management processes and costs to improve reliability and safety and lower operational costs.

A situational intelligence approach to understanding your vegetation challenges and potential problems maps vegetation’s proximity to your networks, predicts how vegetation will grow and interact with those networks over time, and prioritizes the geographic locations and network sections most susceptible to vegetation problems.

Data about tree and plant species, microclimates, past and future rain fall, time of year, and other variables informs growth models that improve your vegetation management schedules. By applying analytics to this data, you can prioritize your work more effectively to address true problem areas and not just the next assignment in the vegetation management cycle.

By working differently, working smarter, you can optimize your vegetation operations budget and make your networks and assets more reliable.

Copyright: alephcomo / 123RF Stock Photo

Recommended Posts

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

truck-convoy